New Directions — Fourth Generation apps, Agile, and the New Paradigm

The world is moving forward and Moore’s Law is accelerating in interesting ways on the technology side, which opens new opportunities, especially in software.  In the past I have spoken of the flexibility of Fourth Generation software, that is, software that doesn’t rely on structured hardcoding, but instead, is focused on the data to deliver information to the user in more interesting and essential ways.  I work in this area for my day job, and so using such technology has tipped over more than a few rice bowls.

The response from entrenched incumbents and those using similar technological approaches in the industry focused on “tools” capabilities has been to declare vices as virtues.  Hard-coded applications that require long-term development and structures, built on proprietary file and data structures are, they declare, the right way to do things.  “We provide value by independently developing IP based on customer requirements,” they declare.  It sounds very reasonable, doesn’t it?  Only one problem: you have to wait–oh–a year or two to get that chart or graph you need, to refresh that user interface, to expand functionality, and you will almost never be able to leverage the latest capabilities afforded by the doubling of computing capability every 12 to 24 months.  The industry is filled with outmoded, poorly supported, and obsolete “tools’ already.  Guess it’s time for a new one.

The motivation behind such assertions, of course, is to slow things down.  Not possessing the underlying technology to provide more, better, and more powerful functionality to the customer quicker and more flexibly based on open systems principles, that is, dealing with data in an agnostic manner, they use their position to try to hold up disruptive entries from leaving them far behind.  This is done, especially in the bureaucratic complexities of A&D and DoD project management, through professional organizations that are used as thinly disguised lobbying opportunities by software suppliers such as the NDIA, or by appeals to contracting rules that they hope will undermine the introduction of new technologies.

All of these efforts, of course, are blowing into the wind.  The economics of the new technologies is too compelling for anyone to last long in their job by partying like it’s still 1997 under the first wave of software solutions targeted at data silos and stove-piped specialization.

The new paradigm is built on Agile and those technologies that facilitate that approach.  In case my regular readers think that I have become one of the Cultists, bowing before the Manfesto That May Not Be Named, let me assure you that is not the case.  The best articulation of Agile that I have read recently comes from Neil Killick, whom I have expressed some disagreement on the #NoEstimates debate and the more cultish aspects of Agile in past posts, but who published an excellent post back in July entitled “12 questions to find out: Are you doing Agile Software Development?”

Here are Neil’s questions:

  1. Do you want to do Agile Software Development? Yes – go to 2. No – GOODBYE.
  2. Is your team regularly reflecting on how to improve? Yes – go to 3. No – regularly meet with your team to reflect on how to improve, go to 2.
  3. Can you deliver shippable software frequently, at least every 2 weeks? Yes – go to 4. No – remove impediments to delivering a shippable increment every 2 weeks, go to 3.
  4. Do you work daily with your customer? Yes – go to 5. No – start working daily with your customer, go to 4.
  5. Do you consistently satisfy your customer? Yes – go to 6. No – find out why your customer isn’t happy, fix it, go to 5.
  6. Do you feel motivated? Yes – go to 7. No – work for someone who trusts and supports you, go to 2.
  7. Do you talk with your team and stakeholders every day? Yes – go to 8. No – start talking with your team and stakeholders every day, go to 7.
  8. Do you primarily measure progress with working software? Yes – go to 9. No – start measuring progress with working software, go to 8.
  9. Can you maintain pace of development indefinitely? Yes – go to 10. No – take on fewer things in next iteration, go to 9.
  10. Are you paying continuous attention to technical excellence and good design? Yes – go to 11. No – start paying continuous attention to technical excellent and good design, go to 10.
  11. Are you keeping things simple and maximising the amount of work not done? Yes – go to 12. No – start keeping things simple and writing as little code as possible to satisfy the customer, go to 11.
  12. Is your team self-organising? Yes – YOU’RE DOING AGILE SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT!! No – don’t assign tasks to people and let the team figure out together how best to satisfy the customer, go to 12.

Note that even in software development based on Agile you are still “provid(ing) value by independently developing IP based on customer requirements.”  Only you are doing it faster and more effectively.

Now imagine a software technology that is agnostic to the source of data, that does not require a staff of data scientists, development personnel, and SMEs to care and feed it; that allows multiple solutions to be released from the same technology; that allows for integration and cross-data convergence to gain new insights based on Knowledge Discovery in Databases (KDD) principles; and that provides shippable, incremental solutions every two weeks or as often as can be absorbed by the organization, but responsively enough to meet multiple needs of the organization at any one time.

This is what is known as disruptive value.  There is no stopping this train.  It is the new paradigm and it’s time to take advantage of the powerful improvements in productivity, organizational effectiveness, and predictive capabilities that it provides.  This is the power of technology combined with a new approach to “small” big data, or structured data, that is effectively normalized and rationalized to the point of breaking down proprietary barriers, hewing to the true meaning of making data–and therefore information–both open and accessible.

Furthermore, such solutions using the same data streams produced by the measurement of work can also be used to evaluate organizational and systems compliance (where necessary), and effectiveness.  Combined with an effective feedback mechanism, data and technology drive organizational improvement and change.  There is no need for another tool to layer with the multiplicity of others, with its attendant specialized training, maintenance, and dead-end proprietary idiosyncrasies.  On the contrary, such an approach is an impediment to data maximization and value.

Vices are still vices even in new clothing.  Time to come to the side of the virtues.

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