Move It On Over — Third and Fourth Generation Software: A Primer

While presenting to organizations regarding business intelligence and project management solutions I often find myself explaining the current state of programming and what current technology brings to the table. Among these discussions is the difference between third and fourth generation software, not just from the perspective of programming–or the Wikipedia definition (which is quite good, see the links below)–but from a practical perspective.

Recently I ran into someone who asserted that their third-generation software solution was advantageous over a fourth generation one because it was “purpose built.” My response was that a fourth generation application provides multiple “purpose built” solutions from one common platform in a more agile and customer-responsive environment. For those unfamiliar with the differences, however, this simply sounded like a war of words rather than the substantive debate that it was.

For anyone who has used a software application they are usually not aware of the three basic logical layers that make up the solution. These are the business logic layer, the application layer, and the database structure. The user interface delivers the result of the interaction of these three layers to the user–what is seen on the screen.

Back during the early advent of the widespread use of PCs and distributed computing on centralized systems, a group of powerful languages were produced that allowed the machine operations to be handled by an operating system and for software developers to write code to focus on “purpose built” solutions.

Initially these efforts concentrated on automated highly labor-intensive activities to achieve maximum productivity gains in an organization, and to leverage those existing systems to distribute information that previously would require many hours of manual effort in terms of mathematical and statistical calculation and visualization. The solutions written were based on what were referred to as third generation languages, and they are familiar even to non-technical people: Fortran, Cobol, C+, C++, C#, and Java, among others. These languages are highly structured and require a good bit of expertise to correctly program.

In third generation environments, the coder specifies operations that the software must perform based on data structure, application logic, and pre-coded business logic.These three levels of highly integrated and any change in one of them requires that the programmer trace the impact of that change to ensure that the operations in the other two layers are not affected. Oftentimes, the change has a butterfly effect, requiring detailed adjustments to take into the account the subtleties in processing. It is this highly structured, interdependent, “purpose built” structure that causes unanticipated software bugs to pop up in most applications. It is also the reason why software development and upgrade configuration control is also highly structured and time-consuming–requiring long lead-times to even deliver what most users view as relatively mundane changes and upgrades, like a new chart or graph.

In contrast, fourth generation applications separate the three levels and control the underlying behavior of the operating environment by leveraging a standard framework, such as .NET. The .NET operating environment, for example, controls both a library of interoperability across programming languages (known as a Framework Class Library or FCL), and virtual machine that handles exception handling, memory management, and other common functions (known as Common Language Runtime or CLR).

With the three layers separated, with many of the more mundane background tasks being controlled by the .NET framework, a great deal of freedom is provided to the software developer that provides real benefits to customers and users.

For example, the database layer is freed from specific coding from the application layer, since the operating environment allows libraries of industry standard APIs to be leveraged, making the solution agnostic to data. Furthermore, the business logic/UI layer allows for table-driven and object-oriented configuration that creates a low code environment, which not only allows for rapid roll-out of new features and functionality (since hard-coding across all three layers is eschewed), but also allows for more precise targeting of functionality based on the needs of user groups (or any particular user).

This is what is meant in previous posts by new technology putting the SME back in the driver’s seat, since pre-defined reports and objects (GUIs) at the application layer allow for immediate delivery of functionality. Oftentimes data from disparate data sources can be bound together through simple query languages and SQL, particularly if the application layer table and object functionality is built well enough.

When domain knowledge is incorporated into the business logic layer, the distinction between generic BI and COTS is obliterated. Instead, what we have is a hybrid approach that provides the domain specificity of COTS (‘purpose built”), with the power of BI that reduces the response time between solution design and delivery. More and better data can also be accessed, establishing an environment of discovery-driven management.

Needless to say, properly designed Fourth Generation applications are perfectly suited to rapid application development and deployment approaches such as Agile. They also provide the integration potential, given the agnosticism to data, that Third Generation “purpose built” applications can only achieve through data transfer and reconciliation across separate applications that never truly achieve integration. Instead, Fourth Generation applications can subsume the specific “purpose built” functionality found in stand-alone applications and deliver it via a single platform that provides one source of truth, still allowing for different interpretations of the data through the application of differing analytical approaches.

So move it on over nice (third generation) dog, a big fat (fourth generation) dog is moving in.

Fat Tuesday Interlude — New Orleans and Mardi Gras

If New York is the cultural capital of the United States, and San Francisco its heart, then New Orleans must be its soul. For many visitors, the city of New Orleans is represented by the bars and bohemian nightlife of Bourbon Street and, if they venture out just a bit further, it is the French Quarter.

But New Orleans is a place unique in American culture. It is the city that gave birth to jazz–America’s classical music. It has been the incubator of artists, musicians, writers, and entrepreneurs that have introduced a unique multicultural perspective and flavor to American society. It’s Mississippi River has served to introduce new immigrants to American society and to introduce America’s heartland to a melding of cultures and ethnicity.

The city has its roots in the French culture and legal system that founded it, yet it has been transformed through the years by each new flag and influence under which it has existed: Cajuns, the Spaniards, African slaves, American settlers, indigenous people, Caribbean immigrants, Creoles, Italians, Mexican, Central and South American immigrants, and today, people from all lands. Each group celebrated and celebrates their heritage and, in the process are thrown together in a gumbo of ethnic, cultural, and economic admixture that is uniquely American.

For me, New Orleans is like the beautiful woman who has been abused by those who would dominate her, but who picks herself up and overcomes the challenges thrown in her way. The city’s positioning was problematic from the start, sitting between Lake Pontchartrain and the Mississippi, with the Gulf of Mexico looming close by. As the city grew and became the financial and trading capital of the southern states, more and more swampland was drained and built on. Hurricanes and tornadoes have leveled many of her buildings and broken her levies, flooding her streets, costing lives and livelihoods.

But New Orleans has also faced human challenges, especially from those who have resented or devalued her multicultural and other contributions. After the overthrow of Reconstruction, the imposition of Jim Crow imposed itself on its people. It was met by continuous resistance and eventually overthrown, but not before it had its effects on underfunded public schools, great urban wastelands from urban renewal and highway construction, and crumbling neighborhoods.

The Storyville neighborhood–lest the troops and sailors be corrupted by miscegenation–was closed by order of the War Department in 1917 and later leveled–its rich history living on in our music and in our culture, though its physical embodiment long gone.

Its strong roots in Catholicism and its variations, the melding of Native American and African slave culture, and the introduction of other religious traditions from far flung places across the world often made it suspect to the more staid and closed sections of American society.

The reduction of the financial sector, automation and containerization of the its port that reduced high paying jobs, highway construction and resulting suburbanization, redlining, white flight, and Federal neglect in the wake of Hurricane Katrina have all represented existential threats to the city.

And yet it goes on. The people of New Orleans–new arrivals and those who returned home after exile in places like Houston–celebrate their heritage and their culture in the New World in New Orleans.

I am not a resident or native of New Orleans, but I have had a lifetime romance with it. I have spent a good deal of time there and I have seen and lived with its changes over the years. When I walk down the sidewalks in the neighborhoods of New Orleans it is almost as if I am greeted from every corner. People smile and wave, though I am a stranger. People share their unique perspectives on things, and trustingly expose their vulnerabilities, wearing fewer masks than I encounter anywhere else–and when they do wear masks it is to celebrate life and living, and even our shared mortality.

As an old Navy hand I am not so deluded as to believe that the city does not have its downsides or its dangers, as most urban–and rural–areas do. I have walked through cities across the world, through many rough seaport and other neighborhoods. Still, we must keep in mind that we live, especially in our own country, during a relatively safe period. Poverty is a disease, not a moral failing.

New Orleans today remains genuine. It has not experienced the billionaire sanitizing that New York underwent during the Bloomberg years. It is not being gentrified and its character smoothed out by high tech as we are seeing in San Francisco. At least, not yet. It’s neighborhoods are rebuilding and it’s people are proud and optimistic.

So to those who read this blog: Happy Mardi Gras!

 

 

Friday Hot Washup: Daddy Stovepipe sings the Blues, and Net Neutrality brought to you by Burger King

Daddy Stovepipe sings the Blues — Line and Staff Organizations (and how they undermine organizational effectiveness)

In my daily readings across the web I came upon this very well written blog post by Glen Alleman at his Herding Cat’s blog. The eternal debate in project management surrounds when done is actually done–and what is the best measurement of progress toward the completion of the end item application?

Glen rightly points to the specialization among SMEs in the PM discipline, and the differences between their methods of assessment. These centers of expertise are still aligned along traditional line and staff organizations that separate scheduling, earned value, system engineering, financial management, product engineering, and other specializations.

I’ve written about this issue where information also follows these stove-piped pathways–multiple data streams with overlapping information, but which resists effective optimization and synergy because of the barriers between them. These barriers may be social or perceptual, which then impose themselves upon the information systems that are constructed to support them.

The manner in which we face and interpret the world is the core basis of epistemology. When we develop information systems and analytical methodologies, whether we are consciously aware of it or not, we delve into the difference between justified belief and knowledge. I see the confusion of these positions in daily life and in almost all professions and disciplines. In fact, most of us find ourselves jumping from belief to knowledge effortlessly without being aware of this internal contradiction–and the corresponding reduction in our ability to accurately perceive reality.

The ability to overcome our self-imposed constraints is the key but, I think, our PM organizational structures must be adjusted to allow for the establishment of a learning environment in relation to data. The first step in this evolution must be the mentoring and education of a discipline that combines these domains. What this proposes is that no one individual need know everything about EVM, scheduling, systems engineering, and financial management. But the business environment today is such, if the business or organization wishes to be prepared for the world ahead, to train transition personnel toward a multi-disciplinary project management competency.

I would posit, contrary to Glen’s recommendation, that no one discipline claim to be the basis for cross-functional integration, only because it may be a self-defeating one. In the book Networks, Crowds, and Markets: Reasoning about a Highly Connected World by David Easley and Jon Kleinberg of Cornell, our social systems are composed of complex networks, but where negative perceptions develop when the network is no longer considered in balance. This subtle and complex interplay of perceptions drive our ability to work together.

It also affects whether we will stay safe the comfort zone of having our information systems tell us what we need to analyze, or whether we apply a more expansive view of leveraging new information systems that are able to integrate ever expanding sets of relevant data to give us a more complete picture of what constitutes “done.”

Hold the Pickle, Hold the Lettuce, Special Orders Don’t Upset Us: Burger King explains Net Neutrality

The original purpose of the internet has been the free exchange of ideas and knowledge. Initially, under ARPANET, Lawrence Roberts and later Bob Kahn, the focus was on linking academic and research institutions so that knowledge could be shared resulting in collaboration that would overcome geographical barriers. Later the Department of Defense, NASA, and other government organizations highly dependent on R&D were brought into the new internet community.

To some extent there still are pathways within what is now broadly called the Web, to find and share such relevant information with these organizations. With the introduction of commercialization in the early 1990s, however, it has been increasingly hard to perform serious research.

For with the expansion of the internet to the larger world, the larger world’s dysfunctions and destructive influences also entered. Thus, the internet has transitioned from a robust First Amendment free speech machine to a place that also harbors state-sponsored psy-ops and propaganda. It has gone form a safe space for academic freedom and research to a place of organized sabotage, intrusion, theft, and espionage. It has transitioned from a highly organized professional community that hewed to ethical and civil discourse, to one that harbors trolls, prejudice, hostility, bullying, and other forms of human dysfunction. Finally and most significantly, it has become dominated by commercial activity, dominated by high tech giants that stifle innovation, and social networking sites that also allow, applying an extreme Laissez-faire attitude, magnify and spread the more dysfunctional activities found in the web as a whole.

At least for those who still looked to the very positive effects of the internet there was net neutrality. The realization that blogs like this one and the many others that I read on a regular basis, including mainstream news, and scientific journals still were available without being “dollarized” in the words of the naturalist John Muir.

Unfortunately this is no longer the case, or will no longer be the case, perhaps, when the legal dust settles. Burger King has placed it marker down and it is a relevant and funny one. Please enjoy and have a great weekend.

 

Saturday Midnight Special Government Shutdown Blues — Samantha Fish, Nikki Hill, Mike Zito, Joe Louis Walker, and Popa Chubby

I have a number of colleagues, friends, and family serving the public interest and I am sure that serial dysfunctional governance by Continuing Resolution, critical positions at senior levels being unfilled, and now a shutdown that will affect their ability to make ends meet are weighing on them at this moment. Thus, a bit of blues music for our times seems to be apropos.

For those not familiar with the history or the form of the music, rather than a music that leads one to hopelessness and resignation, the blues catalogue through the human folk tradition the day-to-day worries and challenges of everyday people.

The blues were born from the work songs of African-American slaves–a brutal environment that punished summarily any sign of protest or rebellion. Thus two outlets were allowed to them–the use of music during heavy labor and mundane work that the slave owners encouraged as a way of ensuring quiescence and productivity, and in religious worship, which was thought as a means of pacification through the acceptance of sanctified music. The slave owners and slavery’s supporters did not fully understand nor recognize the subversive message in the lyrics of these two musical roots, which communicated human dignity, perseverance, and–yes–hope, in the face of oppression, rape, murder, and brutality. The rhythm of the music is organic, borrowed in part from the African rhythms of the different tribes from which the slaves originated, but also derived from whatever was at hand in the New World borrowed from the ruling white society and indigenous American tribes, many of whom accepted runaway slaves and, later, freedmen among their tribes. Thus, forged from the fire of oppression, came a music that embodied the aspirations inspired by the promise embodied in such ideas as freedom, democracy, and equality in a uniquely American way, The blues are the musical soil and soul of American ideal.

The blues carried itself into jazz, which elevated the simplistic folk forms, and has become an elegant, groundbreaking, and uniquely American classical music that continues to push the limits of musical improvisation and expression. It also carried itself into and influenced American popular music, where its deceivingly simplistic forms were imitated and evolved into other musical styles, merging and developing over time.With the great African-American migration to northern cities to escape Jim Crow, the music evolved and incorporated urban influences, with the added dynamics of electrified instruments, and a new defiant message that included elements of black pride, black power, and northern attitude.

Other countries adopted and unabashedly mimicked the music, reviving interest in the music during times when it was undervalued and ignored in this, its country of origin. The British Invasion of the 1960s reintroduced the music to the U.S. through the hybrid of blues-rock, thus anyone familiar with the Rolling Stones, Led Zepplin, early Fleetwood Mac, The Yardbirds, Cream, and others are listening to the blues adapted and recycled to a new generation. It continues today with a broader mix and diversity of musicians that have taken the music of those first generations of African-American blues musicians–Robert Johnson, Bessie Smith, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Son House, B.B. King, Albert King, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and others–and have broadened it, continuing in both the tradition and in extending the music to make it an urgent and vital expression of the human experience. It reveals in its best form the interconnectedness and basic humanity that we all share, across cultures, across generations, and across time.

Unfortunately many blues performers cannot be readily found on YouTube in authorized forms for sharing. No doubt, this post, as with posts in the past that covered blues and jazz will record below average traffic compared to even the esoteric and specialized subjects of Big Data and project management. Fortunately, however, individuals like Don Odell and his Legends studios in Massachusetts records the new generation of bluesmen and blueswomen and so I can share these artists tonight. Each of the musicians below–all amazing and talented in their own way–provide a diversity of perspectives of life and its challenges through their music.

The first artist is Samantha Fish. She hails from Kansas City, Missouri, a town that is rich in blues and jazz history. She lists her influences as visiting blues musicians who performed at Knuckleheads Saloon, a popular musical venue. She began performing in 2009 and she has been mercurial. Her blues album, Wild Heart, charted as the top blues album in 2015. Her latest album is Belle of the West.

 

Nikki Hill is from North Carolina and, if you aren’t familiar with her the clip that follows should bring you running to the store to find her music. She combines intelligent lyrics, strong woman attitude, and powerful vocals to her music–all hallmarks of a great blues vocalist. Her first album is Heavy Hearts, Hard Fists.

 

 

Mike Zito, like Samatha Fish, also is from the mid-west. In his case it is St. Louis. Born in 1970, he began singing at the age of 5, and performed locally in the St. Louis area for many years. In 2008 he gained his big break and was signed on by the Eclecto Groove label. The title song from his 2009 release entitled Pearl River won Song of the Year at the 2010 Blues Music Awards. In 2013 his album Gone to Texas also garnered critical reviews and was nominated for best album at Blues Music Awards in 2013. His latest album is Make Blues, Not War. Here he is covering “Fortunate Son.”

 

 

Joe Louis Walker is, of course, a living blues legend and a living national treasure. He took up guitar growing up in the San Francisco bay area. He hooked up with Mike Bloomfield, Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead and other musical pioneers that pushed rock and psychedelic music to new pathways. Burned out on blues after 1975, he turned to sanctified music. However, after attending the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 1985 he returned to his blues roots. Here he is performing “One Time Around.”

 

 

Last, but not least, is Popa Chubby. The name is actually the nom de plume of Ted Horowitz, who grew up in the Bronx, New York. After working the woodshed for a number of years (he was born in 1960) he was finally “discovered” in 1992 by the public radio station in Long Beach, California, which sponsored a national blues talent search. Since that time his album production has been prolific, spanning and incorporating other musical genres within a blues structure. Idiosyncratic and eclectic, Papa Chubby combines showmanship, independence, and amzaing musical chops to keep the music vital and interesting. In the clip below Popa Chubby is the large man who plays lead guitar, and like a good leader who showcases the talents of others, has deferred to his keyboardist to take the lead vocals on the song, “Not So Nice Anymore.”

 

 

 

 

Learning the (Data) — Data-Driven Management, HBR Edition

The months of December and January are usually full of reviews of significant events and achievements during the previous twelve months. Harvard Business Review makes the search for some of the best writing on the subject of data-driven transformation by occasionally publishing in one volume the best writing on a critical subject of interest to professional through the magazine OnPoint. It is worth making part of your permanent data management library.

The volume begins with a very concise article by Thomas C. Redman with the provocative title “Does Your Company Know What to Do with All Its Data?” He then goes on to list seven takeaways of optimizing the use of existing data that includes many of the themes that I have written about in this blog: better decision-making, innovation, what he calls “informationalize products”, and other significant effects. Most importantly, he refers to the situation of information asymmetry and how this provides companies and organizations with a strategic advantage that directly affects the bottom line–whether that be in negotiations with peers, contractual relationships, or market advantages. Aside from the OnPoint article, he also has some important things to say about corporate data quality. Highly recommended and a good reason to implement systems that assure internal information systems fidelity.

Edd Wilder-James also covers a theme that I have hammered home in a number of blog posts in the article “Breaking Down Data Silos.” The issue here is access to data and the manner in which it is captured and transformed into usable analytics. His recommended approach to a task that is often daunting is to find the path of least resistance in finding opportunities to break down silos and maximize data to apply advanced analytics. The article provides a necessary balm that counteracts the hype that often accompanies this topic.

Both of these articles are good entrees to the subject and perfectly positioned to prompt both thought and reflection of similar experiences. In my own day job I provide products that specifically address these business needs. Yet executives and management in all too many cases continue to be unaware of the economic advantages of data optimization or the manner in which continuing to support data silos is limiting their ability to effectively manage their organizations. There is no doubt that things are changing and each day offers a new set of clients who are feeling their way in this new data-driven world, knowing that the promises of almost effort-free goodness and light by highly publicized data gurus are not the reality of practitioners, who apply the detail work of data normalization and rationalization. At the end it looks like magic, but there is effort that needs to be expended up-front to get to that state. In this physical universe under the Second Law of Thermodynamics there are no free lunches–energy must be borrowed from elsewhere in order to perform work. We can minimize these efforts through learning and the application of new technology, but managers cannot pretend not to have to understand the data that they intend to use to make business decisions.

All of the longer form articles are excellent, but I am particularly impressed with the Leandro DalleMule and Thomas H. Davenport article entitled “What’s Your Data Strategy?” from the May-June 2017 issue of HBR. Oftentimes when addressing big data at professional conferences and in visiting businesses the topic often runs to the manner of handling the bulk of non-structured data. But as the article notes, less than half of an organization’s relevant structured data is actually used in decision-making. The most useful artifact that I have permanently plastered at my workplace is the graphic “The Elements of Data Strategy”, and I strongly recommend that any manager concerned with leveraging new technology to optimize data do the same. The graphic illuminates the defensive and offensive positions inherent in a cohesive data strategy leading an organization to the state: “In our experience, a more flexible and realistic approach to data and information architectures involves both a single source of truth (SSOT) and multiple versions of the truth (MVOTs). The SSOT works at the data level; MVOTs support the management of information.” Elimination of proprietary data silos, elimination of redundant data streams, and warehousing of data that is accessed using a number of analytical methods achieve the necessary states of SSOT that provides the basis for an environment supporting MVOTs.

The article “Why IT Fumbles Analytics” by Donald A. Marchand and Joe Peppard from 2013, still rings true today. As with the article cited above by Wilder-James, the emphasis here is with the work necessary to ensure that new data and analytical capabilities succeed, but the emphasis shifts to “figuring out how to use the information (the new system) generates to make better decisions or gain deeper…insights into key aspects of the business.” The heart of managing the effort in providing this capability is to put into place a project organization, as well as systems and procedures, that will support the organizational transformation that will occur as a result of the explosion of new analytical capability.

The days of simply buying an off-the-shelf silo-ed “tool” and automating a specific manual function are over, especially for organizations that wish to be effective and competitive–and more profitable–in today’s data and analytical environment. A more comprehensive and collaborative approach is necessary. As with the DalleMule and Davenport article, there is a very useful graphic that contrasts traditional IT project approaches against Analytics and Big Data (or perhaps “Bigger” Data) Projects. Though the prescriptions in the article assume an earlier concept of Big Data optimization focused on non-structured data, thereby making some of these overkill, an implementation plan is essential in supporting the kind of transformation that will occur, and managers act at their own risk if they fail to take this effect into account.

All of the other articles in this OnPoint issue are of value. The bottom line, as I have written in the past, is to keep a focus on solving business challenges, rather than buying the new bright shiny object. Alternatively, in today’s business environment the day that business decision-makers can afford to stay within their silo-ed comfort zone are phasing out very quickly, so they need to shift their attention to those solutions that address these new realities.

So why do this apart from the fancy term “data optimization”? Well, because there is a direct return-on-investment in transforming organizations and systems to data-driven ones. At the end of the day the economics win out. Thus, our organizations must be prepared to support and have a plan in place to address the core effects of new data-analytics and Big Data technology:

a. The management and organizational transformation that takes place when deploying the new technology, requiring proactive socialization of the changing environment, the teaching of new skill sets, new ways of working, and of doing business.

b. Supporting transformation from a sub-optimized silo-ed “tell me what I need to know” work environment to a learning environment, driven by what the data indicates, supporting the skills cited above that include intellectual curiosity, engaging domain expertise, and building cross-domain competencies.

c. A practical plan that teaches the organization how best to use the new capability through a practical, hands-on approach that focuses on addressing specific business challenges.

Saturday Night Music — Harry Dean Stanton Singing “Volver, Volver”

The world lost a talented actor last September when Harry Dean Stanton passed away. He was 91 years old. What many people do not realize is that Stanton was also an accomplished musician and many of his movie roles featured his singing. He also toured with the “Harry Dean Stanton Band” featuring a unique take on mariachi music.

His last role was in the movie “Lucky” in which he played a character much like…Harry Dean Stanton in real life. Unfortunately he was not able to live long enough to make it to the premier of the film.

In the movie there is a touching scene at a children’s birthday party in which he breaks out in music and, for those of you who can find a good interpretation of the song “Volver, Volver” you will immediately understand its significance to a 91 year old man who knows he is nearing the end of his life.  It really speaks to all of us who have garnered life experiences, and anticipates what the young faces at the party will experience on their own:

Yo sé perder, yo sé perder;
Quiero volver, volver, volver.”

Here’s to the memory of Harry Dean Stanton…”you are nothing.”

 

 

 

Weekend Music Interlude — Lukas Nelson singing “Forget About Georgia”

Lukas Nelson is the son of country singer-songwriter Willie Nelson and his current wife Annie D’Angelo. Lukas was born in Austin, Texas but grew up in Maui, Hawaii. He learned guitar and had a talent for singing, which he pursued in order to spend more time with his famous father. He moved to Los Angeles in 2007 to attend Loyola Marymount University, but soon dropped out of college to pursue a music career full time. In October 2008 he formed his band The Promise of the Real.

During their early years the band performed in various SoCal venues and their music, according to AllMusic, the band self-described as “cowboy hippie surf rock.” Since that time he and his band have accompanied Willie Nelson on tour, and have performed as Neil Young’s backup band. Despite the pedigree and promotion, Lukas and his band has not drawn considerable attention nor reached stardom, but that seems to be changing as he approaches his tenth year of performing.

Lukas Nelson’s music has matured over the years, and in 2016 he began to show his talent as a powerful singer-songwriter, drawing from a wide range of musical influences from the Country Outlaw musicians to Jimi Hendrix to Eric Clapton to Neil Young to the Allman Brothers Band, among others. WXPN radio just designated Lukas Nelson and The Promise of the Real band as artist to watch for November 2017. Their new self-titled album was released this past summer on Fantasy Records.

In the performance below the acoustic venue demonstrates the power of his songwriting and the powerful emotions that he elicits in connecting with the subject matter of his songs. His voice is very reminiscent of his father’s, but with a fullness and deepness of its own.